12.15.14Felted slipper materials…

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset I’m so sorry it took me so long to post this!  It seems like life manages to get in the way of your best intentions (especially around the holidays)… but anyway,  I’ll break down the materials into 2 sections since the class was a combination of 2 different workshops…

For the felted slippers:  We used %100 Pelsull wool.  We used about 4 ounces per pair of slippers, and had some left over, so if you’re going to felt a pair a gift, even for a man’s size, 4 ounces should do it.  On the right hand side of my blog, there is a button (link) for New England Felting Supply, there you can find Pelsull and all sorts of different kinds of wool.  We used Pelsull because of the strength and body it has for the slippers.  However, if you wanted them to be super soft on the inside, you can always place a layer of short fiber merino inside, meaning the layer closest to the resist.

For the introduction to wet felting:  For felting flowers, we used a combination of short fiber merino and extra fine merino.  The short fiber merino IS the extra fine merino, but has been combed and chopped, combed and chopped…you get the idea…  Short fiber merino felts quickly and smoothly, and is a pleasure to felt with. Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset Here’s a little refresher for my slipper students, and I truly hope I didn’t hold you up from starting slipper #2!  I still haven’t done my second slipper, but I suffer terribly from second sock syndrome, an issue I developed when I owned a knit shop (hehe)…

Steps: 1. We traced our foot.  Then we traced our outline about an inch or so out to allow for shrinkage once we start felting our slipper.  2. Cut it and cover it with a nice solid layer of Pelsull wool.  3. Wet the fibers and press the water out so it reaches the edge of the resist (our foam form).  4. Flip it over and wrap the overage around the resist to the other side, trying to avoid big bulges of wool, flatten it the best you can.  Fill in the blanks with more pelsull.  You should have a nice solid layer wrapped around your entire resist.  Once you’ve wet both sides, check for areas where your resist comes through, the wool is too thin there and you’ll need to add to it.  Once you’ve checked the piece from front to back and you know that there is wool solid throughout, it’s time to cover your slipper-to-be with a sheet of bubble wrap (bubbles facing down) and rub.  I add a bit of soapy water to the top of my bubble wrap so that my hand can rub around freely.  5. Rub the slipper for about 15-20 minutes and flip it over and repeat, and remember as we discussed in class, it’s always good to rub from the edges inward to tighten as you go.  6. Once you’ve rubbed generously both sides of your slipper, you can roll it.  We used a pool noodle to keep the pressure even, if you have one, great.  These can be found at the dollar store or a pool supply shop.  Good to have and makes felting so much easier.  Once you see that the slipper is shrinking over the resist, you can cut a slit or whatever desired shape you’d like for the opening of your slipper.  I always cut 2 inches from the bottom of the slipper, remember that the heel gets shaped and the sides come up once we start to felt it around our foot.  7. Pull the resist out.  Pour a little soapy water around the opening and make sure your felt and finish the edge.  8.  Slip your foot into the slipper, (it’s wet and feels weird, I know) it’s the only way we get to see how much further we need to go.  Fold your bubble wrap and use it to felt your slipper around your foot.  Rub the heel, the sides, and the toes, felt it ALL!  9. Now you’re at the home stretch, you’re now going to felt and work your slipper to the size and shape that you need it to be.  10. Work and finish your felting, but remember to shape and mold your slipper so it dries exactly how you want it to be.  You can stuff it with bubble wrap to give it form while it dries.  If you have any questions, feel free to send me an email!  Enjoy! Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *